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Poster: scuffle Date: Feb 11, 2009 9:27pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: DVD video disk patent licensing

I have cleaned up some public domain movies a bit and put them on DVD video disks that play in common movie players. I want to give a local library some copies. The difficulty is that the physical and logical medium is patented. The optical disk, the layout of data that controls the movie player, and the encoding systems for the moving images and sound are patented, and as far as I know licensing is required to legally distribute them in a DVD video product. Local librarians and even the media production people at some nearby colleges were stumped. The half dozen or so patent consortia that act as agents for the myriad patent holders seem oriented towards dealing with substantial business with fabulously costly patent lawyers at hand. Does anyone know how an individual could obtain patent licensing for a modest number of DVD video disks?

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Poster: Video-Cellar Date: Feb 11, 2009 11:13pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: DVD video disk patent licensing

The patent for the physcal media is covered by the manufacturers licence to use the DVD standard.

For the authoring software you use, you will generally have received a licence to use the electronic/software patent. You will need to check you end-user license. If you have legally obtained major software like Nero, NTI, MyDVD, etc they come with end user licences that include unrestricted patent licensing to the DVD file structure and MPEG-2.

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Poster: scuffle Date: Feb 12, 2009 11:30pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: DVD video disk patent licensing

Thank you. I use open source software self-compiled on a Linux system. I will need several days to look at various authoring programs as you suggested.

So far, I have found that the free Nero burner software packed with disk burners does not include DVD video disk licensing. In its terms of use it says use of MPEG video and Dolby sound is licensed only for personal use, and it refers us to the usual licensing agents for those. That means it includes no licensing for them at all.

The terms of use for a trial version of the retail edition of Nero for Linux makes no mention of DVD video disk licensing. That is a pretty important bit of information to leave unmentioned for a tool that produces video disks.

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Poster: Video-Cellar Date: Feb 13, 2009 2:02am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: DVD video disk patent licensing

With the Nero OEM version "Essentials" that comes with burners you usually only get a 30 day trial of DVD functionality, MPEG-2, MP3 and Dolby Digital (AC-3) Stereo. If you purchase the full version you get a package of third party licences including the above and DD surround (up to 5.1) encoding. I am not sure whether they are personal (non commercial) use or unrestricted. But gifting DVDs to a library would probably be fair non-commercial use.

Otherwise you might try a basic off-the-shelf professional DVD Authoring system like DVD Lab Pro or Abode Premiere. They come with unrestricted licensing.

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Poster: scuffle Date: Feb 13, 2009 11:55am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: DVD video disk patent licensing

Thank you. That sounds promising. I will probably need several weeks to check the programs and maybe write to the publishers to confirm the extent of licensing they include. I will post a new forum message to report what I find.